Environmental activists threw soup at Van Gogh’s ‘Sunflowers’

Environmental activists threw soup at Van Gogh’s ‘Sunflowers’

Europe 1 with AFP
modified to

7:20 p.m., October 14, 2022

Environmental activists from the Just Stop Oil movement threw tomato soup at Van Gogh’s masterpiece Sunflowers, on display at the National Gallery in London on Friday, with only minor damage to the frame, the museum said. They said: “What is more valuable, art or life?”.

Environmental activists from the Just Stop Oil movement threw tomato soup at Van Gogh’s masterpiece Les on Friday sunflowers, on display at the National Gallery in London, with only minor damage to the frame, according to the museum. According to press images from the movement demanding an immediate halt to any new oil or gas project, two activists threw the contents of two soup cans at the plant, which is estimated to cost more than $84 million.

Police “were quickly on the scene at the National Gallery this morning after two female protesters threw a substance at a painting and then taped themselves to a wall,” Scottland Yard said in a statement. They were arrested specifically for “humiliation”.

The frame has a “small damage”.

The museum said in a statement that two people “appeared to be glued to the adjacent wall sunflowers by Van Gogh (1888)” and also “a red substance – which appears to be tomato soup – was thrown at the painting”. The frame suffers “minor damage”, but the painting is “intact”, the National Gallery assured.

This new action by the group, which has previously targeted artworks, comes as part of a month of action during which it has also blocked streets on several occasions.

“The livelihood crisis comes from fossil fuels – everyday life has become unaffordable for millions of families who are freezing and starving – they can’t even afford a can of soup,” Phoebe Plummer, 21, an activist, is quoted as saying in a statement from the movement . “At the same time” “people are dying” because of “fires and droughts caused by climate change,” she argued. “We can’t afford new oil and gas projects,” they would “take everything away.”


Reference: www.europe1.fr