Legislative: can Elisabeth Borne remain at the head of the government?

Legislative: can Elisabeth Borne remain at the head of the government?

What if, just one month after obtaining the post of Prime Minister, Elisabeth Borne had already left Matignon? After the results of the legislative elections of this Sunday, June 19, where the presidential camp obtained only a very relative majority in the Assembly, all eyes are on the former Minister of Labor, who led the electoral battle. If Elisabeth Borne narrowly won her constituency of Calvados, three of her ministers were eliminated and more than 40 seats are missing from Together! to obtain an absolute majority. Enough to open a breach for the opposition: Rachida Dati of the Republicans and Louis Aliot of the National Rally have called for his departure, while the deputies of rebellious France have already announced their desire to table a motion of censure against the government of the Prime Minister, from July 5.

For its part, the presidential majority procrastinates, through the voice of the government spokesperson, Olivia Grégoire: “The question did not arise”, she explained on France Inter, this Monday, June 20, before to attack Jean-Luc Mélenchon half-heartedly: “The Prime Minister remains a Prime Minister who had the courage to go to the polls.” The government spokesperson confirms a reshuffle in the coming days, but does not answer the question: until when will Elisabeth Borne be able to remain Prime Minister, with a National Assembly without a clear majority?

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“The leader of the majority must take responsibility for the failure in the legislative elections”

Symbolically, if Elisabeth Borne has no legal obligation to leave her post, the poor record of the legislative elections weighs on her shoulders. “The head of government is considered the leader of the majority, advances Paul Bacot, professor emeritus of political science at Sciences Po Lyon. And the leader of the majority must take responsibility for the failure in the legislative elections, if there is failure. .” But in this specific case, it’s not so clear, he nuances: “It’s the glass half full or half empty. Together! has the majority, but is far from an absolute majority. We can consider that Elisabeth Borne has lost and must go, or that she has saved the furniture and can stay.

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