Stellantis disassociates itself from the lobby of European manufacturers

Stellantis disassociates itself from the lobby of European manufacturers

By the end of 2022, the Stellantis group will no longer be a member of the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers (ACEA). If this announcement resounds like a clap of thunder in the small middle of the car industry, it will not cause much excitement among the general public who is unaware of almost everything of the actions that this lobby leads with the European authorities. It is however the ACEA which tirelessly reminds Brussels and Strasbourg that it is playing a bad trick on Europeans to force them to switch to electric traction, before the establishment of a sufficiently dense network of terminals fast, reliable and accessible charging with a universal payment method. Something that is far from certain.

It is again that the ACEA which tried to assert the interest of extending the career of plug-in hybrid cars beyond 2035, the date approved on June 8 by the European Parliament to prohibit the marketing of any thermal motorization (which whether it is petrol, diesel, LPG, gas or ethanol). The French government had sided with this proposal, which was deemed to be conciliatory and constructive, although it was well relayed by the Automotive Platform and our national manufacturers, first and foremost of which was Stellantis (born in January 2021 from the union between the PSA Group and FiatChrysler Automobiles).

No official reason is provided by Stellantis for leaving ACEA

Obviously, ACEA’s inability to convince MEPs of the merits of plug-in hybrid vehicles (which allow electric vehicles to be driven during the week, then freeing themselves of an embryonic charging network on Sundays) came to end of the patience of Carlos Tavares. In a press release issued yesterday evening, June 13, the boss announced his intention to dissociate himself from the fifteen other manufacturers who are members of ACEA and to create, within Stellantis, a “forum on freedom of movement”.

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This body is billed as an annual meeting, with an expert advisory board including “mobility and technology providers, academics, politicians, and scientists”. Stated objective, to develop “an effective, global and inclusive 360-degree approach involving all those who wish to contribute to the construction of sustainable mobility”. In other words, it is neither more nor less than dealing with the same subjects that are important to ACEA, but from the angle chosen by Stellantis and according to its own calendar. Doesn’t the adage say that you are never so well served as by yourself?

Stellantis aspires to “more direct interaction with citizens and stakeholders”.

Stellantis specifies in its press release that its forum will be “based on facts”, a formulation close to that used in the climate field where one speaks of policies or strategies “based on science”. Environmental activists appreciate the little spade. Carlos Tavares, like ACEA, criticizes them for having used the scandal of diesel engines rigged by the Volkswagen Group in 2015 as a pretext to convince MEPs and public opinion that no faith can any longer be given to the arguments put forward by the industrial. Worse, that the industrialists have collectively demonstrated their desire to circumvent the laws and to try by all means to escape their legal obligations, by placing their economic interests with the collective interest.

Contacted by our colleagues from the Auto Actu.com site, the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers indicated that it “respects Stellantis’ decision to withdraw its membership of the association at the end of this year”, while regretting to see this eminent member leave. “We remain committed to acting as the common and strong voice of EU-based car, truck, van and bus manufacturers,” an ACEA spokesperson said.

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