Why is street pooling dangerous?

Why is street pooling dangerous?

“Street pooling” consists of opening fire hydrants to cool off in summer. An illegal and dangerous practice – Illustration photo by Raul De Los Santos / Unsplash

This is called “street pooling”. Returning to each period of high heat, “street pooling” (“street pool”) consists of opening the fire hydrants to generate a refreshing fountain. A practice that we saw in particular in Beauvais on Tuesday June 14 and which generated tensions with the police.

The practice, although relatively common, is completely illegal. The opening of a fire hydrant is considered as damage to property intended for the public utility. As such, it is sanctioned with a sentence of up to 5 years’ imprisonment and a fine of 75,000 euros.

Electrocution, aquaplaning, flooding of cellars…

But that’s not even the riskiest part of this practice. As the SDIS of Oise reminds us, Street pooling remains a fundamentally dangerous practice. The Oise firefighters list at least three different risks of injury: when the bollard is opened due to the pressure of the fire hydrant, risk of electrocution (in the event of electrical equipment nearby) and risk of road accident for vehicles that could be surprised by a section of wet roadway in the middle of a drought.

The Oise firefighters also list additional dangers, in particular for property and the risk of flooding of cellars for adjacent buildings. Worse: opening a fire hydrant could create a water shortage and hamper the action of firefighters in the event of a fire. However, fires break out more often and more easily in times of drought.

Finally, street pooling is also and above all a tremendous waste of drinking water: approximately 80 m3 of water per hour.

The article Why is “street pooling” dangerous? first appeared on Oise Hebdo.

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